Exploring the cutting edge in RNA-based cell line selection

Published: 29 November 2021
Interview
Susan Sharfstein,
Scott Tenenbaum

Susan Sharfstein is a Professor of Nanobioscience at SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Albany, New York. Professor Sharfstein received her BS in chemical engineering with honors from Caltech in 1987 and her PhD in chemical engineering from UC Berkeley in 1993. She received an NIH fellowship to pursue postdoctoral studies, initially at UC Berkeley and subsequently at UCLA Medical School. Dr Sharfstein joined the faculty at the University of Toledo in Bioengineering in 1996. In 2001, she joined the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In 2010, she joined the faculty at SUNY Polytechnic Institute. Professor Sharfstein’s research interests include mammalian and microbial cell bioprocessing, control of protein glycosylation, metabolic engineering, biosensing, and development of systems for high-throughput screening. She is the author of over 70 papers and book chapters in the fields of biotechnology and bioprocessing.

Scott Tenenbaum is the Head of Nanobioscience and the Laboratory of RNA Nanotechnology at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the SUNY-Polytechnic Institute. He received his PhD in Microbiology and Immunology from Tulane University Medical Center and did his post-doctoral training at Duke University Medical Center, where he helped pioneer RIP-Chip/Seq technology and the field of ‘Ribonomics’, which is the genomic-scale study of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Dr Tenenbaum holds 19 issued or pending patents which have served as the basis for 4 biotechnology start-up companies including his most recent, sxRNA Technologies, Inc. in the NY Capital Region. He has been awarded numerous honors, including The Judith Graham Pool Fellowship, The James A. Wilson, M.D. Fellow in Cancer Award; The Robert M. and Barbara R. Bell Basic Science of Cancer Award; The SUNY Golden Apple Teaching Award; The SUNY-Research Foundation Rising Star Award; and most recently, The SUNY Excellence in Research Award. Dr Tenenbaum has had numerous NIH and NSF grants, maintaining continuous federal funding since 2004. The focus of his research lab is RNA and RNA-binding proteins and he is currently developing an RNA ‘nano-switch’ platform technology called sxRNA to be used as a molecular tool, a diagnostic and as a therapeutic.

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